Flight 1934-11
Flight
The stand arranged by the Russian Soviet. In the foreground is a full-sized model of the balloon gondola used for stratosphere flights. Behind it is the ancient ski-plane used for the Chelyuskin expedition rescue. On the left is a pair of the huge double wheels of the Maxim Gorky undercarriage, a model of which may be seen above the emblematic hammer and sickle near the foreground.
The Polish P.Z.L. 24, claimed to be one of the fastest Military aircraft in the Show, its Gnome-Rhone K.14 engine giving it a top speed of 257 m.p.h. On the left is the P.Z.L. 11C, an earlier version of the 24. Behind them is the P.Z.L. 26, specially built for competition in the Challenge de Tourisme.
A selection of oil coolers: (top left) Farman 431; (top right) P.Z.L. 24; (bottom left) Focke-Wulfe; (bottom right) Potez 54.
In the centre of this display is the Breguet 46T as it will look when finished. Two Mistral Major engines of 880 h.p. each are expected to give it a top speed of 240 m.p.h. In the foreground is the Dewoitine D.511, France's latest and fastest fighter.
The aileron mass-balances on the Dewoitine 511.
The radiator underneath the fuselage of all-metal Dewoitine 511 fighter
The stand arranged by the Russian Soviet. In the foreground is a full-sized model of the balloon gondola used for stratosphere flights. Behind it is the ancient ski-plane used for the Chelyuskin expedition rescue. On the left is a pair of the huge double wheels of the Maxim Gorky undercarriage, a model of which may be seen above the emblematic hammer and sickle near the foreground.
FOREIGN APPRECIATION: One of the Hawker types supplied to foreign air forces. A "Hart" ( "Pegasus") bearing the three crowns of Sweden.
"HAWK MAXIMUS": Sqd. Ldr. Malcolm McGregor and Henry Walker reached Melbourne in their standard Miles "Hawk Major" 7 days 15 hours after leaving Mildenhall.
The Letov S.231 has a pair of machine guns in each bottom wing.
BRISTOL "BULLDOG," MARK IV 600 h.p. "Mercury" V1.S.2
A view from above of the Amiot 142, one of the largest bombing machines in the Show. The engines can either be Hispanos as shown or Gnome-Rhones as in the Amiot 143.
Some Vickers-Supermarine machines: 3, The single-seater day and night fighter (Rolls-Royce "Goshawk").
This combined Armstrong-Whitworth and A. V. Roe stand is one of the most attractive in the Show. All the three machines are painted white, with their exposed metal surfaces plated.
SHORT "R24/31" Two 700 h.p. Rolls-Royce "Goshawk"
An impressive view of the latest Boeing. N.A.C.A. cowlings have replaced the short-chord cowlings fitted to the 247 and three-bladed Hamilton-Standard airscrews are used.
The control cabin of the 247-D, showing the mounting of the wireless aerial, the normal screen and the sliding side window.
The new Boeing 247-D has shown a marked improvement in performance on the 247. The engines are geared and supercharged nine-cylinder Pratt and Whitney "H" type "Wasps."
The Boulton & Paul "Overstrand" with two Bristol "Pegasus" engines.
"SKYBIRDS". Three recent additions to the realistic 1-72nd-scale models produced by A. J. Holladay & Co., Ltd. They are: Albatros D.III; D.H. "Comet"; and Fairey "Seal."
The "Firefly," single-seater fighter (Rolls-Royce "Kestrel")
A "PRIVATE VENTURE": The Gloster F.7/30 ("Mercury" VI S.) Day and Night Fighter.
A British corner: the Hawker "Fury" is on the left, and the Bristol 143, interesting for its new form of construction, on the right.
FOREIGN APPRECIATION: One of the Hawker types supplied to foreign air forces. A Portuguese "Fury" ("Kestrel").
The Polish P.Z.L. 24, claimed to be one of the fastest Military aircraft in the Show, its Gnome-Rhone K.14 engine giving it a top speed of 257 m.p.h. On the left is the P.Z.L. 11C, an earlier version of the 24. Behind them is the P.Z.L. 26, specially built for competition in the Challenge de Tourisme.
A selection of oil coolers: (top left) Farman 431; (top right) P.Z.L. 24; (bottom left) Focke-Wulfe; (bottom right) Potez 54.
The Bloch 211: One of the very large all-metal military aircraft with revolving gun turrets. In this case the engines are Hispanos.
THE OBSERVATORY: The front gunner's enclosed cockpit on this new Marcel Bloch 130 Bomber is similar to that on our Boulton and Paul "Overstrand."
OLD AND NEW: A "Rota" flying over the ruins of Old Sarum. The outlines of the old Cathedral appear in the left bottom corner.
This combined Armstrong-Whitworth and A. V. Roe stand is one of the most attractive in the Show. All the three machines are painted white, with their exposed metal surfaces plated.
VERSIONS OF THE FAIREY "FOX": The Hispano-engined model, which has a startling performance
VERSIONS OF THE FAIREY "FOX": The Advanced Training Type, fitted with Siddeley "Serval" engine.
PHOTOGRAPHY: An airman is handing up a camera to be fitted inside an "Audax"
THE PUFF TARGET: Practising artillery reconnaissance. The "Audax" is flying low so as to appear in the photograph. Small smoke cartridges are exploded on the ground to represent shell bursts round a target, and the pilot sends down W/T messages to correct the aim.
A LINE-UP: Hawker "Audax" machines (Rolls Royce ''Kestrel" engines) of the School of Army Co-operation.
FOREIGN APPRECIATION: One of the Hawker types supplied to foreign air forces. An Iraqi "Audax" ("Pegasus").
FOR THE NEAR EAST: A batch of Hawker "Hardy" general-purpose machines (525 h.p. Rolls-Royce "Kestrel" IB) recently completed by the Gloster Aircraft Co., Ltd. These machines will form the new equipment of No. 30 (B) Squadron, stationed at Mosul, Iraq.
The "Seal," Fleet Air Arm three-seater (Siddeley "Panther").
"SKYBIRDS". Three recent additions to the realistic 1-72nd-scale models produced by A. J. Holladay & Co., Ltd. They are: Albatros D.III; D.H. "Comet"; and Fairey "Seal."
A "Singapore III" flying boat (4 "Kestrels") of the type in which Sir Philip Sassoon recently flew from England to Egypt. That boat belongs to No. 210 (F.B.) Squadron at Pembroke Dock.
Some Vickers-Supermarine machines: 2, The "Seagull" Mark V (Bristol "Pegasus" pusher) amphibian flying boat;
The Junkers Ju.52 on floats; it has three "Jumo 5" Junkers diesel engines.
THE SWASTIKA IN PARIS. A scene in the Grand Palais while preparations were being made for the opening of the Fourteenth International Aero Exhibition, which opens to-morrow. The machine in the foreground is a German Junkers.
Head-on view of one of the Junkers Ju.52 floats.
The T.S.R. (Bristol "Pegasus");
The "Vildebeest" ("Pegasus") Torpedo Bomber.
The "Valentia" (two "Pegasus") Troop-carrier;
The split trailing edge flaps, and the arrangement of the retractile undercarriage. Note the generous fillet at the junction of wing and fuselage.
(Top left) The rear portion of the fuselage showing the semi-monocoque construction, (below) a portion of the "multi-cellular" wing, and (right) a part of the cabin structure.
One of the nacelles, and (right) two of these units mounted on the centre section of the wing.
The cockpit of the Heinkel He. 70, the fast German mail-cum-passenger plane for which a top speed of 222 m.p.h. is claimed.
TUNIS: An aerial view of Tunis Aerodrome. In addition to the French military aeroplanes on the ground, the squadron of Avro 626 aircraft which recently flew out to Egypt from England, are also shown in this picture. Incidentally, these Egyptian machines reached Cairo on October 1.
This combined Armstrong-Whitworth and A. V. Roe stand is one of the most attractive in the Show. All the three machines are painted white, with their exposed metal surfaces plated.
FOR ECONOMICAL TRAINING: The de Havilland "Tiger Moth" can be fitted with "Gipsy III" or "Gipsy Major" engine.
FLAPS FOR THE "EXPRESS": The D.H. 86 machines which are being delivered to Jersey Airways next year will be fitted with split flaps on the upper wing.
A BROAD SMILE: Our old friend Capt. H. S. Broad is pleased with the performance of his 'bus. This happy "snap" was taken when he was testing a D.H. "Dragon."
The "Hendon" Night Bomber (two Rolls-Royce "Kestrels");
A general view of the Salon. In the foreground are corners of the Hawker and Bristol stands, and prominent in the centre of the picture is the Caudron "Aiglon," a two-seater open cockpit development of the Caudron which won the Zenith Cup.
Unusual cantilever undercarriage on the Caudron C.600.
A development of the "Rafale," the Caudron 520 seats four persons, and with its Renault "Bengali Six" a top speed of 199 m.p.h. is claimed.
Another French example ot a cheap machine - the little Mauboussin "Corsaire," which is also supplied in a cabin version. The engine may be a Salmson or a Pobjoy.
The unusual undercarriage of the Messerschmitt Me 108, which is retractable by means of a worm and worm wheel.
A selection of oil coolers: (top left) Farman 431; (top right) P.Z.L. 24; (bottom left) Focke-Wulfe; (bottom right) Potez 54.
FOR LUFT HANSA: The Junkers Ju.160, developed from the Ju.60, has been built for "express traffic" work. A 700 h.p. B.M.W. "Hornet radial (Pratt and Whitney licence) gives it a maximum speed of 211 m.p.h. With Hamilton adjustable pitch airscrew the machine cruises at 186 m.p.h. and carries a disposable load of 2,535 lb. The N.A.C.A. cowling contain a forced draught arrangement which directs hot air from the engine downward to avoid fouling the cockpit and cabin.
BRITISH KLEMM "SWALLOW" 80 h.p. Pobjoy "Cataract"
A beautiful example of shot-welding on the Russian Stand: the "Stal 2," a four-passenger monoplane built of stainless steel
Some examples of the beautiful workmanship put into the Russian "Stal 2." The whole machine is built up of drawn sections of very thin gauge stainless steel, shot-welded on the Budd system.
Refuelling with Shell at Mersa Matruh in Egypt.
OFF TO THE ANTARCTIC : The Northrop machine. Polar Star, which will be used by the Lincoln Ellsworth Expedition for flights over the South Pole, being shipped at Dunedin en route for Deception Island.
NOCTURNE: Refuelling the winners' D.H. "Comet" at the Baghdad control. Scott and Campbell Black arrived almost immediately after the Mollisons had left for Karachi.
FOURTH TO FINISH: Lt. Cathcart Jones and Ken Waller in their D.H. "Comet," which finished fourth and is now on its way homeward in an attempt to beat the standing record.
JUST LIKE A ROCKET: Actually this is Lt. Cathcart Jones and Ken Waller taking off in their D H. "Comet" from Baghdad aerodrome, leaving a trail of sand dust.
HOME AGAIN: The D.H. "Comet" surrounded by an admiring crowd at Lympne alter Lt. Cathcart Jones and Ken Waller had flown 23,000 miles to Melbourne and back in less than a fortnight.
PILOTS AND OWNER: Lt. Cathcart Jones, Ken Waller and Bernard Rubin beside the record-breaking D.H. "Comet" at Lympne.
TEAM WORK: The men responsible for the "Comet." From left to right, Mr. A. E. Hagg (chief designer), Capt. G. de Havilland (technical director), Major F. B. Halford (designer of the "Gipsy-Six" racing engine), Mr. F. T. Hearle (general manager), and Capt. C. C. Walker (chief engineer), of the De Havilland Aircraft Company.
"SKYBIRDS". Three recent additions to the realistic 1-72nd-scale models produced by A. J. Holladay & Co., Ltd. They are: Albatros D.III; D.H. "Comet"; and Fairey "Seal."
AT DESENZANO: Scene after the successful speed record attempt. The machine as it was being brought ashore after the flight. Note the wing surface radiators and oil coolers on the floats.
The record-breaking Macchi M.72, which is covered almost entirely with radiator surfaces.
THE ITALIAN HIGH-SPEED FLIGHT: From left to right, Warrant-Officer Fruet, Lt. Buffra, Lt.-Col. Cassinelli, Col. Bernasconi, Commandant of the High-speed Flight, Capt. Baldi, Capt. Scapinelli, and Warrant-Officer (now Lt.) Agello.
AT DESENZANO: Scene after the successful speed record attempt. The clean design of the Macchi-Castoldi 72.
FOR PACIFIC FLIGHT: The twin-engined Airspeed "Envoy" monoplane, in which Mr. C. T. P. Ulm and Mr. G. M. Littlejohn propose to fly from Canada across the Pacific to Australia, being shipped at Southampton for Montreal.
The Mureaux 180 C2, an all-metal two-seater fighter with an unusual cockpit arrangement. The Hispano Xcrs engine has a nose radiator.
AT HAWAII: Sir Charles Kingsford-Smith's Lockheed "Altair," Lady Southern Cross, arrives at Wheeler Field, Hawaii, after its flight from Suva, Fiji.
A British corner: the Hawker "Fury" is on the left, and the Bristol 143, interesting for its new form of construction, on the right.
Speed without sacrifice of passenger comfort is the chief objective in the design of the H.S.T.10.
Some alternative seating arrangements provided for in the design of the Blackburn H.S.T.10.
Blackburn H.S.T.10 Two Napier "Rapier" VI's
Very English-looking despite its registration letters, the Caudron "Freygate" carries two passengers seated side by side behind the pilot.
Stainless steel construction: a Hawker "Nimrod" wing.
A selection of oil coolers: (top left) Farman 431; (top right) P.Z.L. 24; (bottom left) Focke-Wulfe; (bottom right) Potez 54.
SUPER-FLAPPED: A Fieseler (Argus) in the takeoff tests of the International Touring Competition at Warsaw. Note the slots, the huge Fowler flaps extending along the wings, and the small ailerons operating at the tips above the wing surface.
A DETRACTABLE UNDERCARRIAGE: Mr. Mils Burcham, the American aerobatic pilot, looses a wheel from his Bird biplane while stunting at the recent National Air Races, Cleveland. Note the wheel bouncing on the ground. Burcham made a perfect dead-stick landing on one wheel.
TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO: Last Tuesday, October 30, was the twenty-fifth anniversary of Lt. Col. J. T. C. Moore-Brabazon's historic flight at Shellbeach, where, on October 30, 1909, he accomplished a circular flight of one mile on the all-British Short biplane, thereby winning the Daily Mail prize of ?1,000 for the first Briton to fly a circuit of one mile in a British-made machine. Our illustration shows the actual flight in progress.
COMMANDER AND CRAFT: The Fokker F18, Snipe, which will make the Atlantic crossing next month, and her commander, J. J. Hondong.
The Hanriot 180 T, a small sesquiplane so constructed that the top of the rear portion of its fuselage is interchangeable, thus enabling the machine to be used for a variety of purposes.
The military training version of the cabin Hanriot, in this case called the 190m. The rear cockpit has been arranged to carry a gun-ring
This is how the special suitcases are arranged in the Hanriot 180 T.
The only large flying boat in the Show - the Liore et Olivier H.24-2 with four Gnome-Rhone 7 Kd. 350 h.p. engines. It will be used on the Algiers-Marseilles service.
The tail units and unusual bracing of the Liore et Olivier H.24.
The Polish P.Z.L. 24, claimed to be one of the fastest Military aircraft in the Show, its Gnome-Rhone K.14 engine giving it a top speed of 257 m.p.h. On the left is the P.Z.L. 11C, an earlier version of the 24. Behind them is the P.Z.L. 26, specially built for competition in the Challenge de Tourisme.
This slot on the P.Z.L.26 smoothes the air flow over the tail at high angles of incidence.
A NEW REGIME: On October 28 Mussolini celebrated the anniversary of Rome's capitulation to Fascism by, among many other ceremonies, inaugurating the new combine of all the Italian Air Lines into one body called Ala Littoria, which means, in a broad sense, the Fascist Wing. Our photograph, taken at the seaplane port of Ostia, near Rome, shows men painting out the company's old name and painting in the new name in anticipation of the ceremony. The flying boat is a Savoia Marchetti S 66 which runs between Rome and Tripoli.
THE SPARTAN CRUISER as used on London - Isle of Wight Air Line Service.
A twin-float seaplane designed for catapult launching: The Pierre Levasseur P.L.200 with Hispano 9 Vbrs engine.
One of the floats which support the tail of the Levasseur P.L.200.
The "Vellox" (two "Pegasus") heavy load carrier;
In the centre of this display is the Breguet 46T as it will look when finished. Two Mistral Major engines of 880 h.p. each are expected to give it a top speed of 240 m.p.h. In the foreground is the Dewoitine D.511, France's latest and fastest fighter.
BRISTOL 120 ("Pegasus").
"Hanging" control column of the Caudron "Phalene"; the cranked column operates the hydraulic brakes.
Some Vickers-Supermarine machines: 1, The "Scapa" flying boat (two Rolls-Royce "Kestrels");
The photograph shows how carefully the fin and tail plane of the Avia 51 are faired into the metal fuselage.
The rear gun positions of the Breguet 413 M4
ARTISTRY: A Flight photographer's impression of the Caudron C.450 which won the Deutsch de la Meurthe Cup Race this year. It is most effectively displayed at the Paris Aero Show.
A GENERAL PURPOSE TYPE: The Armstrong-Whitworth A.W.19. (725 h.p. Siddeley "Tiger").
A POLISH TWO-SEATER: The rear gunner in this P.W.S.19 observation monoplane has an exceptionally good field of fire rearwards.
A CHEAP FRENCH LIGHT PLANE: The Brochet-Poinsard monoplane, which sells at 14,000 francs. Fitted with a 24 h p Poinsard engine (2-cyl., horizontally opposed, air-cooled), it has a speed range of 30-115 km/h (18.6 - 71.5 m.p.h.), and a fuel consumption of 5 litres per 100 km (about 60 miles per gallon).
CURIOUSER AND CURIOUSER! This is a new French speed machine designed by M. Payen and constructed at Etampes. Fitted with a 400 h.p. engine it is expected to attain a speed of nearly 400 m.p.h.!
THE RETRACTILE FASHION SPREADS: A notable feature of the new Bristol Day and Night Fighter, apart from the cantilever low-wing construction, is the use of a retractile undercarriage. The engine is a Bristol "Mercury."
The tail units of the Arado 69 - an unusual arrangement obviating the necessity for a split elevator and possibly reducing spinning tendencies.
The Potez 60, with the three-cyiinder 60 h.p. Potez engine, is a French attempt to satisfy the demand for a very cheap and light club machine.
Streamlined outriggers carrying the undercarriage and wing struts of the little Potez 60.