Flight 1937-10
Flight
TAKER - AND TAKEN: This snapshot was taken from an Armstrong Whitworth Whitley. In the Avro Commodore, flown by Flt. Lt. Reynell, is Flight's chief photographer, and they are just manoeuvring into position to secure the striking close-up picture.
AT CLOSE RANGE: An Armstrong Whitworth Whitley heavy bomber photographed from a machine flying close alongside. The pilot of the Whitley was F/O. E. S. Greenwood, the assistant A.W. test pilot.
Production: A corner of the wing shop at Baginton, showing spar boxes being assembled in their jigs.
Some constructional features of the Whitley. On the left is the retractable undercarriage. Note the mounting of the oil tank in the leading edge. Right: the leading edge next to the engine mounting; it carries the petrol tanks, shaped to fit the curvature.
More armament: General Milch and Air Chief Marshal Sir Edgar Ludlow-Hewitt lead the party past the tail turret of an A. W. Whitley.
In the cockpit of the Whitley. There is ample room for the two pilots, and the view in all essential directions is unrestricted. At the controls when this picture was taken was F/O. E. S. Greenwood.
THE ARMSTRONG WHITWORTH WHITLEY. A Flight Artist's Exposition of the Main Structural Details
THE ARMSTRONG WHITWORTH WHITLEY. Two Siddeley Tiger IXs - 805 (max.) h.p. each at 7,200 ft.
General Milch, at Mildenhall, watches a demonstration by a gunner in the rear cockpit of a Bristol Blenheim.
SOMETHING DIFFERENT: Last Sunday a Swissair Douglas D.C.3 put into Hatfield for a few minutes. The crew had not come to inspect fhe Albatross but merely to look at Hatfield as a possible reserve when Croydon is impossible.
Workers in the Douglas factory at Santa Monica well into their job on a D.C.3.
Interesting new military type flown by its makers' test pilots at the meeting. The Curtiss Y1P-36 (Twin-wasp)
A particularly welcome exhibit is the Heinkel He. 112 fighter, a diminutive projectile which does about 300 m.p.h. carrying two Oerlikon "cannons" and a pair of machine guns. The engine is an inverted-vee Junkers Jumo 210Ea of 685 (max.) h.p.
A part-sectional view, by a German artist, of the Heinkel He. 112. Some outstanding features include: (1) Air intake; (2) port machine gun; (3) fuel tank; (4) Oerlikon "cannon"; (5) 10 kg. fragmentation bombs; (6) flap; (7) fuel tank; (8) oil tank; (9) radio; (10) pneumatic gun-operating gear.
The Savoia Marchetti S.79 (three Alfa-built Pegasus) on the right is "I-11," the winner of the Damascus race. It is one of the most arresting machines on show, in its red and green paint. In the background is the new Savoia S.83 transport developed from the S.79 design. This is said to be good for nearly 270 m.p.h.
Mercury, the upper component of the Short-Mayo effort, during trials on the Medway. This is a comparatively small machine of less than 1,200 h.p.
In civilian dress: The arrival of our German guests at Croydon at the beginning of the week. General Milch is being welcomed by A.V.-M.R.E.C. Peirse. General Wenninger, German air attache, is in front of the cabin door of the Heinkel He.111.
FEIGNED FLIGHT: With four of the new 830 h.p. Bramo 323 J. Fafnir engines. Lufthansa's new 26-seater Focke-Wulf 200 (Condor), will have a speed of 230 m.p.h. This cleverly faked picture of a model shows the Condor's businesslike appearance.
The Miles Magister Two-seat Training Monoplane (130 h.p. "Gipsy-Major" engine).
MAJESTY AND MAGISTER: A production-type Miles Magister with Gipsy Major engine set against a background of the kind which is the raison d'etre of the blind-flying "bonnet" over the rear cockpit. The Magister is really an improved Hawk Trainer.
A batch of Miles Magisters (Gipsy Major) just emerged from their makers' works at Woodley, Reading. These machines are now in steady production for Service ab initio and blind-flying training.
Art Goebie's Boeing 100 sky-writer.
Not-so-new equipment: the visitors pass between the ranks of trusty Heyfords, each machine with its crew, in full flying kit, standing to attention.
FREIGHT ONLY: One of International Air Freight's Curtiss Condors on the tarmac at Croydon. These machines have been specially modified to take really large pieces of freight and to simplify the loading process.
THE ILL WIND: A corner of Rollason's hangar at Croydon. In the foreground is a Stinson Reliant, with the little Latvian V.E.F. J.12 behind it and the South African Junkers Junior on the right. One of I.A.F.'s Curtiss Condor freighters can be seen in the far distance.
The somewhat nebulous military Cant triple-engined floatplane. Armament stowage is quite arbitrary at the moment, but the machine will certainly have a good performance. Beyond it is the incredible SS3, concocted at Guidonia.
Interesting new military type flown by its makers' test pilots at the meeting. The Seversky P.35 (modified Twin Wasp), in racing trim.
A fly-past at Mildenhall, for the benefit of the guests, by a squadron of Vickers Wellesleys with their external "egg-boxes."
ASPECT RATIO: Vickers Wellesleys of a unit which demonstrated before our German guests at Mildenhall.
General Milch, at Mildenhall, watches a demonstration by a gunner in the rear cockpit of a Wellesley.
The projection of so much rear armament on the Junkers Ju. 86K bomber is deplorable aesthetically and aerodynamically. The "dustbin" would be more at home in a museum than on such a fine bombing machine.
The unfriendly looking aeroplane is the Caproni Ca.135 bomber. The camouflage scheme is a multi-coloured one consisting mainly of red, grey, yellow and green.
Officials of the Dutch Army Air Service at Schipol during preliminary trials of the first Pegasus-engined T.5 bomber. The engines, it will be seen, have gilled cowlings.
Farman is developing some high-performance landplanes from the Centaure type which is being used on the South American service.
The Piaggio P.32 bomber (left) has a peculiar high-lift device permitting a strikingly short span. On the right the golden Breda 65 fighter-attack machine is caught taking off at a very tail-up attitude.
Flight of fancy - strange duck-like shadows cast by a formation of U.S. Army Northrops
Lethal Trails: Northrop A.17 attack machines demonstrate gas dispensation
TRAINING CRUISE: Camera impression by one who took part in the recent training cruise of No. 204 (G.R.) Squadron to Malta. Two of the boats, returning to England;
TRAINING CRUISE: Camera impression by one who took part in the recent training cruise of No. 204 (G.R.) Squadron to Malta. H.M.S. Glorious with attendant destroyer from 3,000 ft;
TRAINING CRUISE: Camera impression by one who took part in the recent training cruise of No. 204 (G.R.) Squadron to Malta. Refuelling at Gibraltar from 50 gall, drums by means of the boat's auxiliary engine. Note the extra long-range tank.
TRAINING CRUISE: Camera impression by one who took part in the recent training cruise of No. 204 (G.R.) Squadron to Malta. The navigator of one of the four Londons - P/O. Hyde - at work;
PIRATES BEWARE! No. 209 (G.R.) Squadron arriving at Malta from Felixstowe on September 19. The Squadron has been taking part in anti-piracy patrols
LOCK-UP ACCOMMODATION: H.M.S. Sheffield, a cruiser of the new City class, carries two Supermarine Walrus amphibian flying boats, which are housed as shown above. Of 9,000 tons displacement, the Sheffield has twelve 6in. guns and eight 4m. on twin high-angle mountings. Provision is made for a third aircraft. A multiple pom-pom, bug-bear of dive bombers, will be observed above the starboard hangar.
HONOLULU BOUND: Such a prosaic excrescence as the wing-tip float of a Sikorsky S.43, used on the Hawaiian inter-island service, assumes a dramatic aspect against this Pacific background.
Going on parade: A Flight photograph taken from one of the units of a Squadron of Harrows on the way to Mildenhall.
MORE POWER FOR THE TIPSY: A single-seater Tipsy monoplane has now been fitted with a 40 h.p. four-in-line inverted Train engine, giving the machine a cruising speed of 110 m.p.h. This special Tipsy is sold over here by Brian Allen Aviation, of Croydon, at ?395.
The photograph of the Tiger Moth, which looks rather upset in the hands of Test-Pilot Buckingham, was obtained on quite a different occasion. Below the clouds it was just an ordinary grey overcast autumn day, yet here again are blue sky and sunshine unlimited.
Panorama: The new building can be seen behind the Club fleet, which is lined up on the tarmac in the centre picture.
"Twenty-Five-Hour": At work on one of the Club Tigers - now the standard training type at Brooklands.
IN SERVICE DRESS: To replace the D.H.89 which members of the Air Council have used for their official journeys since 1935, the De Havilland Company last week delivered this D.H.86B. This well-known commercial type, with its four 200 h.p. Gipsy Six I engines, cruises at 140 m.p.h.
Mr. Douglas Fawcett with his Hornet Moth. An experienced mountaineer, he spends much of his time in Switzerland, flying blissfully in all sorts of weather, over, around and among the peaks which he knows so well. He is the brother of Colonel Fawcett, who disappeared while exploring the Amazon.
ON HER WAY: Trials of the De Havilland Albatross high-speed, long-range transport are still proceeding at Hatfield and this most beautiful of all large aeroplanes is frequently seen over Hertfordshire slipping along comfortably at her 210 m.p.h. cruising speed. This, her latest picture, was obtained during trials by Major Hereward de Havilland.
The picture shown here of the De Havilland Albatross, undergoing routine tests for the Air Ministry, was taken on an exceptionally beautiful day for October, and to fly alongside this piece of silver loveliness against an ever-changing background of sunlight and shadow was sheer delight.
STAR AND CRESCENT: Messrs. R. H. Somerset and L. Castlemaine, the General Aircraft pilots who left Hanworth on Sunday with two Monospars for delivery to the Turkish Air League, which will use them for instruction in parachute jumping. The doors of the machines have been slightly modified for the purpose.
Tricycle Experiments: The two views show a new Monospar machine adapted for tests.
The Hafner Gyroplane in this photograph has taken off from a standstill on the compass base seen a few yards to the rear.
CLOSE COMPANY: Hawker Demon two-seater fighters (derated Kestrel V) of No. 64 (F) Squadron caught by the Flight camera immediately after a formation take-off at Martlesham Heath.
A dull afternoon greeted Miss Batten on arrival at Lympne. Her Gull is here seen over Kent en route for Croydon.
A happy photograph of Miss Batten framed in the cockpit of her Gull. Behind her can be seen the petrol tank which in the tropics became too hot to touch.
A Percival Vega Gull (Series I Gipsy Six) which is at present being shipped out to Buenos Aires for the use of the British Air Attache there, Group Capt. A. J. Miley, and his assistant, Sqn. Ldr. P. C. Wood. A Vega Gull is already in use by the Attache in Berlin, Group Capt. F. P. Don.
ATLANTIC SURVEY: Caledonia taxies to her moorings at Horta, Azores, after her recent survey trip in command of Captain Powell.
Bretagne, the French Loire 102, is claimed to have a top speed of 192 m.p.h. with four 720 h.p. Hispano-Suiza Series X engines. The appearance of the machine would suggest something considerably lower.
Loire 102.
The Liore et Olivier H.47 flying boat which, had it not crashed during trials, would have been used by Air France Transatlantique for experimental crossings. With four 860 h.p. Hispano-Suiza Series Y engines, this machine was said to be very fast indeed.
Liore et Olivier H.47.
Nordmeer, one of the two Blohm and Voss Hamburger floatplanes with four Junkers Jumo diesel engines, built specially for transatlantic work. The machine is seen leaving the Heinkel catapult of one of Lufthansa's "floating bases."
The Romeo Ro. 51 fighter on the left is one of the few military models with a fixed undercarriage. Beyond is the Breda 82 bomber, which, the makers say, is as fast as a Blenheim.
The Caproni Ca.134 is the latest word in Italian military biplanes. Intended for army co-operation, it has twin rudders, an outlandish undercarriage and a 900 h.p. Isotta.
In the foreground is the little S.A.I.3 two-seater with the S.A.I.2 cabin machine beyond. The flying boat is the new Macchi MC 99 bomber-reconnaissance machine with a pair of Isotta Assos of 750 h.p. each.
The Romeo Ro. 51 fighter on the left is one of the few military models with a fixed undercarriage. Beyond is the Breda 82 bomber, which, the makers say, is as fast as a Blenheim.
The Piaggio P.32 bomber (left) has a peculiar high-lift device permitting a strikingly short span. On the right the golden Breda 65 fighter-attack machine is caught taking off at a very tail-up attitude.
In the foreground is the little S.A.I.3 two-seater with the S.A.I.2 cabin machine beyond. The flying boat is the new Macchi MC 99 bomber-reconnaissance machine with a pair of Isotta Assos of 750 h.p. each.
In the foreground is the little S.A.I.3 two-seater with the S.A.I.2 cabin machine beyond. The flying boat is the new Macchi MC 99 bomber-reconnaissance machine with a pair of Isotta Assos of 750 h.p. each.
The Savoia Marchetti S.79 (three Alfa-built Pegasus) on the right is "I-11," the winner of the Damascus race. It is one of the most arresting machines on show, in its red and green paint. In the background is the new Savoia S.83 transport developed from the S.79 design. This is said to be good for nearly 270 m.p.h.
THE ILL WIND: A corner of Rollason's hangar at Croydon. In the foreground is a Stinson Reliant, with the little Latvian V.E.F. J.12 behind it and the South African Junkers Junior on the right. One of I.A.F.'s Curtiss Condor freighters can be seen in the far distance.
THE WORLD'S LARGEST LANDPLANE: The Boeing XB-15, which is much bigger even than the YB-17s and which is probably the largest landplane now flying, spurns back the soil on an early test take-off. Designed in the first instance for engines of 1,500 - 2,000 h.p., she is fitted at the moment with four 1,000 h.p. Twin Wasps.
An impression of the Boeing 307 "Stratoliner" landplane. At least one of these machines, now being built at Seattle, is likely to be used by P.A.A. for transatlantic work. It will have a pressure cabin for sub-stratosphere flying.
Centre section of one of the new Atlantic Boeing boats for P.A.A.
A sectioned view of the Boeing 314 Super Clipper of the type which, with auxiliary tankage, is likely to be used some time next year for transatlantic experiments. The engines are four Wright two-row Cyclones of about 1,500 h.p. each.
General arrangement of the Boeing 314 flying boat.
Road-clearers - Lockheed Electras on their way from the docks to Essendon Aerodrome, Melbourne.
TEST FLIGHT: The first of the new Lockheed "14s" photographed on its first flight. Apparently the machine has come up to, or even exceeded, its estimated performance figures, though it is rumoured that the Fowler flap gear demands a new approach technique. K.L.M. are the first European transport firm to place orders for this type which has an estimated cruising speed of about 240 m.p.h. depending on the particular engines installed - whether Cyclones or Hornets.
YET ANOTHER U.S. DESIGNATION: Major Alexander de Seversky takes off in the so-called "Convoy Fighter" (Wright Cyclone).
The Sikorsky S.42. A slightly modified version has been used for transatlantic experiments.
THE ILL WIND: A corner of Rollason's hangar at Croydon. In the foreground is a Stinson Reliant, with the little Latvian V.E.F. J.12 behind it and the South African Junkers Junior on the right. One of I.A.F.'s Curtiss Condor freighters can be seen in the far distance.
THE NEW EAGLE: During the past few months British Aircraft have been trying out a new version of the well-known Eagle. This has a fixed undercarriage, and, for those who prefer to be relieved of retractable responsibility, the machine has certain definite advantages. The greater virtual wing-area and the decreased drag have resulted in a considerably improved take-off and a slower landing, while the causing speed (at 2,000 r.p.m.) is still rather better than 120 m.p.h.
Latecoere 300 Croix du Sud.
Maintenance: A few of the machines which are now going through their C. of A.s, or being otherwise attended to, can be seen in the picture of the maintenance department. On the left of the shop, and outside the picture, are the dope and fabric shops, the bonded stores and various administrative offices.
The flying test-bed for the Bristol Hercules engine is a Northrop monoplane. Note the long-chord cowling with controllable cooling gills. The position of the air intake above the cowling is interesting.
The somewhat nebulous military Cant triple-engined floatplane. Armament stowage is quite arbitrary at the moment, but the machine will certainly have a good performance. Beyond it is the incredible SS3, concocted at Guidonia.
TAKER - AND TAKEN: This snapshot was taken from an Armstrong Whitworth Whitley. In the Avro Commodore, flown by Flt. Lt. Reynell, is Flight's chief photographer, and they are just manoeuvring into position to secure the striking close-up picture.
Filling up: The refuelling and "re-oiling" pumps are all conveniently concentrated at the tarmac end of the new building. The oil, incidentally, is supplied under pressure through a number of filters.
THE BURNELLI IN ENGLAND: On Monday of this week the American version of the Burnelli was flown over to Croydon from Rotterdam by Mr. S. V. Morton. The owner is Sir Cuncliffe Owen, who originally entered this or a similar machine in the abandoned Atlantic race.
BIGGER STILL: Boeing YB-17 long-range heavy bombers of the U.S. Army Air Corps over New York City. Eventually about forty of these Cyclone-powered giants will be in service. Apart from providing useful practical data they have enabled the Boeing concern to solve problems in the construction of four-engined transports and flying boats.
One of the 'blister' turrets of the Boeing YB-17 bomber.
An experimental, private-owner type, the PJC-1, which has recently carried out its test flights quite successfully on the comparatively small power of a Warner Super-Scarab.
THE ILL WIND: A corner of Rollason's hangar at Croydon. In the foreground is a Stinson Reliant, with the little Latvian V.E.F. J.12 behind it and the South African Junkers Junior on the right. One of I.A.F.'s Curtiss Condor freighters can be seen in the far distance.
Latecoere 521 Lieutenant de Vaisseau Paris
Bleriot 5190 Santos Dumont.
Designed in 1933: The Curtiss-Courtney amphibian had a retractable nose wheel as well as retractable main wheels. In addition to being almost buried while in flight, the nose wheel of the amphibian formed a useful fender when coming up to moorings.
DUAL PURPOSE: The much-talked-of Pitcairn "Roadable" Autogiro in its latest form. The Pobjoy Niagara which powers the machine is installed "on its side" in the fuselage and is cooled by special air-ducts. Curiously enough, the machine does not appear to be quite as fast as it was when the engine was mounted conventionally in the nose. Probably the air-duct system introduces new air-flow problems.
C. H. Gotch's Keith-Rider Special, which have small Menasco in-line engine.
A rib and elevator in Noral, which material is being extensively employed in the production Cygnets.
The Cygnet accommodates pilot and passenger and has liberal stowage for luggage and sports gear. It will be seen that the seat now extends across the cabin.
The Delgado, which have small Menasco in-line engine, built by students, is comparable with our T.K.4.
Two views of the Wittman-Curtiss racer, the only water-cooled machine at the races; in one event it averaged 276 m.p.h. for two laps round four pylons.
Earl Ortman's Keith Rider (Twin Wasp Junior), originally built for the MacRobertson race, and twice rebuilt since. It has tankage for 3,000 miles.
Something novel in the French "prototype tour" - the Claude "Canard Aquilon". It is said to cruise at 90 m.p.h. on 40 h.p.
The wind-tunnel model of the Swan less nacelles. Note the extraordinarily neat tail
Mr. R. S. Dickson, C.W.'s chief draughtsman on the Swan, surveys the mock-up of his very efficient-looking design. The nacelles, it will be noticed, are for Gipsy Sixes, although the prototype may have Wasp Juniors.
The amply wide cabin gangway and the central control bank in the cockpit are features revealed in this view taken in the mock-up
The drawing shows that commodious baggage compartments and, considering the performance, a roomy cabin, characterise the machine
The C.W. Swan (Choice of in-line or radial engines)
Another experimental type of unorthodox layout, the Sundorph A-1, powered with a Jacobs L-5. This, like the PJC-1, is a stressed-skin job and is in the same class as the Beechcraft and Stinson. The Sundorph flew in the Bendix Trophy race, but apparently developed wing flutter and retired.