Flight 1939-05
Flight
OUTPUT: Typifying the high-speed bomber carrying a comparatively light load and the slower "heavy-weight" type, the Bristol Blenheim and the Armstrong-Whitworth Whitley (shown) are both key types in the expanded R.A.F.
DIPLOMATIC JOY-RIDE: Looking thoroughly at home in flying kit, M. Gafencu, the Rumanian Foreign Minister, emerges from a Blenheim after a flight at Hornchurch, where he inspected a number of Service types last week.
Over a crowd reminiscent of R.A.F. Display days - A.A.F. Blenheims taking-off at Hendon.
Long-distance formation flights under varying weather conditions are part of the training duties of a bomber squadron as illustrated by this fine impression of Bristol Blenheims.
OUTPUT: Typifying the high-speed bomber carrying a comparatively light load and the slower "heavy-weight" type, the Bristol Blenheim (seen in production here) and the Armstrong-Whitworth Whitley are both key types in the expanded R.A.F.
CAPT. BALFOUR, Under-Secretary for Air, sees Hampdens in production. On the right is Mr. Handley Page and on the left Rear-Admiral Sir Murray Sueter.
The manoeuvrability and the clear arcs of fire justify the makers in terming the Hampden a fighter bomber. On the occasion depicted, its agility was being demonstrated by Major Cordes. The photographic Hampden was piloted by Flt. Lt. J. R. Talbot.
The unimpeded view obtained from the compartment of the front lower gunner and bomber.
Controllability is but one of the many strong points of the Hampden. Here Major Cordes shows it “formating” at 65 m.p.h. with wheels and flaps down.
Production flow. These pictures illustrate the sequence of operations in building the Hampden fuselage. (1) The skeleton of the nose portion being assembled ; (2) after removal to a jig, the skin is riveted on; (3) installing equipment in the starboard half of the centre portion; (4) assembling the two halves of the centre portion in a special jig; (5) the two halves of the fuselage tail portion are built on horizontal jigs, although the split is vertical; (6) the three fuselage portions being brought together for assembly before transport to Radlett. The transparent nose unit is not yet in place.
Growing wings: (1) the Hampden main spar in a horizontal drilling jig; (2) the spar in the assembly jig, where it forms the basis of the whole centre-section; (3) an outer wing having covering finished and ailerons attached; (4) assembling centre and outer wing portions before dismantling them for transport to Radlett; (5) installing leads and engine controls on front wall of spar box; (6) assembling trailing-edge portions in their jigs; (7) the engine installation jigs also have provision for assembling the undercarriage fully extended.
There are two rear gun positions in the Hampden, an upper and a lower. How unhindered are the fields of view and fire obtained from them is shown in the pictures. Major Cordes gives a good illustration of the Hampden as a fighter bomber.
A few of the Hampdens which are now leaving Radlett aerodrome in a nice steady stream for “unknown destinations.”
Cloudscape which give an oddly symbolic impression of the duties of the machine depicted - the Hampden as a purposeful carrier of swift retribution over long distances.
Handley Page Hampden bombers, which, like the Blenheims, are outstanding examples of the work of an old-established manufacturer.
Two stages in the final assembly of wing and fuselage at the Radlett works. Note that the machine now rests on its proper undercarriage.
Bomber production: H.P. Hampdens, capable of 265 m.p.h., seen in the final assembly stage at the assembly plant at Radlett. The Hampden has two Bristol Pegasus XVIII engines with two-speed superchargers.
Interiors which give some idea ot the extensive equipment. The pilot’s cockpit with dashboard and controls.
There are two rear gun positions in the Hampden, an upper and a lower.
The compartment of the front lower gunner and bomber, in the nose of the fuselage
Interiors which give some idea ot the extensive equipment. A view looking forward from the lower aft gun position. The top gunner’s swivelling seat can be seen on the right.
Details of the wing centre-section structure. Inset shows the slotted flap.
Handley Page Hampden (Two Bristol Pegasus XVIII Engines)
‘Split’ construction is a production feature. This sketch shows the main units into which the structure is divided. The middle and tail portions are split vertically into port and starboard halves.
Fuselage details of the Hampden. On the left, the construction of the split tail portion. In the centre, details of the middle portion, showing how the decking locks the sides together. On the right, the structure of the wing-fuselage fairing, built integral with the fuselage.
Cloudscape which give an oddly symbolic impression of the duties of the machine depicted - the Hurricane as an agile defender of the Metropolis
Hurricanes at Northolt
The mask worn by this Hurricane pilot embodies a microphone and oxygen feeding device.
A squadron of Supermarine Spitfire eight-gun fighters practising formation flying several thousand feet above Cambridgeshire.
Line-up of No 19 Squadron Spitfire Is at Duxford in May 1939 before the interception demonstration.
Active Air Defence: Spitfire fighters are among the most potent foes of the raiding bomber.
Pilots of a Spitfire squadron racing for their machines on receipt of an alarm.
MORE PRODUCTION: Of the scores of Supermarine Spitfires already delivered, a large percentage will be seen in action on Empire Air Day.
A dozen Spitfires manoeuvre with uncanny precision at a speed well over 200 m.p.h.
A North American Harvard trainer (Pratt and Whitney Wasp) being flown by a Martlesham test pilot.
THE MIMIC: A striking Flight photograph of the production Fairey Battle, with Flt. Lt. Christopher Staniland in charge, demonstrating the purpose of camouflage.
A superb vertical view of Battle K7558 taken in July 1937. The single forward-firing gun can be seen inboard of the landing light in the starboard wing.
EMPIRE DUST-UP: The first of South Africa’s Fairey Battles arrives at Pretoria from Cape Town. It came to the latter place by ship, and covered the 1,000 miles to Pretoria in four hours in the hands of Major J. Marais of the South African Air Force
A Fairey Battle turns after releasing practice bombs on a target at a typical Armament Training Station of the R.A.F.
The rear gunner in a Fairey Battle bomber demonstrates how he would use his weapon under the shelter of the hinged portion of the cockpit enclosure.
"Бленхеймы" IV, 1940г.
THOROUGHBREDS. The “long-nosed” version of the Bristol Blenheim bomber is being used by certain army co-operation units of the R.A.F. as a long-range strategical reconnaissance machine. In the Flight photograph is a flight from a squadron so equipped.
A symbolic view ot Bristol Blenheims.
Оборонительное вооружение предвоенных Blenheim Mk IV из одного пулемета Lewis или Vickers оказалось недостаточным и было заменено на спаренные пулеметы Browning или Vickers.
A flight of long-nosed Bristol Blenheims of an army co-operation unit. Just after this photograph was secured the machines dived through the clouds at over 300 m.p.h.
A striking line-astern formation by Mo. 16 Squadron, with the Lysanders “stepped” to avoid slipstream.
How supply-containers are dropped by parachute to troops.
Formation work might not loom very large in the war duties of an A.C. Squadron, but No. 16 is good at it.
Westland Lysander army co-operation monoplanes about to dive through the clouds.
Credit for the fine Lysander formations shown in the views may not be given in view of new Air Ministry regulations.
INTIMATE FORMATION: Westland Lysander Army co-operation monoplanes complete with supply containers rehearsing over Odiham for the Great Day.
THE PEEL-OFF. Westland Lysander monoplanes of an R.A.F. Army Co-operation Squadron start a mock divebombing attack for "Flight's" chief photographer. Eight practice bombs may be seen outboard of the main bomb carriers (also used to carry supply canisters) beneath the stub wings.
A sergeant demonstrates how the tail drift sight is used in a Lysander. For the purpose of the picture the fabric was removed - a particularly easy process on this machine
A portable radio transmitter and ground signal strip - the use of which is one of the many ramifications of the duties of No. 16.
Pilots - in a nice variety of Army uniform and Squadron overalls receiving instructions from their C.O., Sqn. Ldr. Charles.
Fixing supply containers to the bomb carriers of a Lysander.
What the gunner sees: The pilot of a Westland Lysander.
The Blackburn Kangaroo, developed from the “G.P.,” was designed for night bombing and anti-submarine patrol. Shown here is a post-war civil version, operated for a time by the Grahame-White company.
The D.H. Tiger Moth and the Miles Magister (shown) are both ab initio types fitted with the D.H. Gipsy Major engine.
Magisters being assembled at Reading.
A group of Airspeed Oxford twin-engined advanced trainers (two Armstrong Siddeley Cheetah X engines).
WINTER OPERATIONS: An early morning scene at the Dominion Skyways’ Semmeterre base in Canada. Bellanca is being refuelled in the foreground while a Fairchild is still resting in its nose-hangar.
Noses - ancient and modern: The Sopwith Pup (circa 1916). Admiring the Pup is one who knew the breed well - Sqn. Ldr. "Taffy" Jones of Reid and Sigrist.
The Blackburn Roc is a two-seater Fleet fighter, very similar to the Skua, fitted with a multi-gun power-driven turret.
The Fairey Firefly, flown by Flt. Lt. C. S.Staniland
A flight of Gloster Gladiator four-gun biplane fighters disport themselves in an exhilarating setting.
R.A.F. Gladiator fighters flying along the Suez Canal are one example of the work of the R.A.F. in the Middle East Command. This is the only overseas Command which has fighters at its disposal, an innovation made necessary by the Italian conquest of Abyssinia. It is also the only overseas Command to have at its head an Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief.
PROTECTIVE COLORATION: A convincing plan view of a Vickers Wellington (two Bristol Pegasus) adopting the mantle of suburban respectability.
Vickers-Wallis geodetic construction gives the Vickers Wellington great weight-lifting powers. The engines may be of the Bristol Pegasus, Bristol Hercules, or Rolls-Royce Merlin type.
The original Ripon torpedo bomber
Истребитель "Гонтлит" I британских ВВС
The Gloster Gauntlet single-seater day-and-night fighter
R.A.F. bomber squadrons are stationed abroad. Here is a striking “pose” by the machines and personnel of the R.A.F. station at Heliopolis. This picture was taken last year, before re-equipment.
No. 13 (A.C.) Squadron, at Odiham, is the first unit to be issued with Hawker Hectors, which mount the 24-cylinder Napier Dagger III air-cooled engine. On the photo, Sqn. Ldr. S. H. C. Gray is posing his machine for our photographer.
OLD SOLDIERS... “A” Flight of No. 27 (Bomber) Squadron, stationed at Kohat, N.W. Frontier Province, snapped while on a bombing raid into Warizistan last February. The machines are Westland Wapitis. The Wapiti is one of the best-loved aircraft ever to be used by the R.A.F.
“Fighting against tribesmen has been more or less incessant on the North-West Frontier for a long time past.” Wapitis - now very near the end of long and faithful service - on a raid into Warizistan.
The Blackburn Shark is seen just before touching down and engaging its arrester hook with the transverse wires on the deck.
Similar in that both were built with a watertight monocoque fuselage, the Shark (shown) and the M.1/30A, employed, respectively, the Siddeley Tiger and the Rolls-Royce Buzzard.
The Fairey Seafox is a light reconnaissance biplane used mainly from cruisers. It has a 16-cylinder Napier Rapier engine.
The Saro London II is sturdy, comfortable and seaworthy.
The transparent covering over the pilots' cockpit in the London gives great comfort in flight, and in particular it avoids the chance of shipping water when taking off, which was a bugbear to the crews of some earlier flying boats.
The tandem disposition of the engines (four Rolls-Royce Kestrels) is but one of the striking features of the Short Singapore III being used by, and introduced for, the R.A.F.
SUNLIT FAREWELL: A fine impression of one of the Short Sunderlands (taken from a sister machine) escorting the Empress of Australia as she left the shores of England for Canada with the King and Queen on board. H.M.S. Repulse can also be seen.
The stately take-off of a Short Sunderland from Felixstowe under the urge of 4,040 h.p.
The Supermarine Stranraer is a quite exceptionally pleasant flying machine as demonstrated by pilots of a Felixstowe G.R. squadron.
A unique ”shot” taken during a turn from the bow cockpit of a Supermarine Stranraer flying boat operating off the East Coast.
The Supermarine Walrus is an amphibian flying-boat used extensively for catapult work.
LORD RECTOR: Air Vice-Marshal Sir David Munro, who was recently installed as Lord Rector at St. Andrew's University, stepping from an Anson at Leuchars on his way to St. Andrews
Curious effect produced at Biggin Hill by two formations of Ansons.
NAVAL NOVELTIES: A fine formation impression of some of the new Blackburn Skua two-seater fleet-fighter dive-bombers (Bristol Perseus engine) from H.M.S. Ark Royal. These machines are the first monoplanes to be used as standard equipment in the Fleet Air Arm and are the latest of a long line of Blackburn products to see service with the Fleet.
Another impression during the escort flight. In the foreground are Swordfish and in the distance is a formation of Skuas.
Blackburn Skua dive-bomber-fighter monoplanes at Brough before delivery to a Fleet Air Arm squadron
A two-seater dive-bomber fighter for Naval use, the Skua is already in service in considerable numbers.
THE BEAUFORT: Slightly suggestive, in frontal aspect, of the Blenheim, but actually very different, the Bristol Beaufort is revealed as a reconnaissance torpedo bomber equipped with Bristol Taurus sleeve-valve engines of over 1,000 h.p. each.
A fine impression of our newest aircraft carrier H.M.S. Ark Royal. She has a complement of 1,550 officers and men. The machines shown are Swordfish.
Главным оружием Swordfish являлась 730-кг торпеда, подвешиваемая под фюзеляжем. Относительно маломаневренный, с небольшой скоростью самолет даже с торпедой отличался отличной устойчивостью в полете.
A Fairey Swordfish torpedo spotter reconnaissance machine, of a type used extensively from the Navy’s aircraft carriers, demonstrates the approach dive tactics of a torpedo attack. The pilot, incidentally, is P/O. M. L. Gaine, who took part in the recordbreaking flight of the Long-Range Development Unit.
Another impression during the escort flight. In the foreground are Swordfish and in the distance is a formation of Skuas.
The approach: A vivid snap, heightened by the slightly crazy horizon, from a Swordfish about to land-on during the Ark Royal's escort duty for Their Majesties last Saturday.
Catapult training is given in the first instance on land. On the photo a Fairey Swordfish is seen being “fired.”
A Fairey Swordfish torpedo-spotter-reconnaissance machine operating as a floatplane.
Noses - ancient and modern: The Fairey P.4/34, now seen with a Rotol airscrew.
A reassuring line-up of Vickers Vildebeest IV torpedo bombers.
The American Lockheed Hudson, seen here minus its turret, is a general reconnaissance type. This machine is being flown by a Martlesham test pilot.
Our new standard bomber transport aircraft is the Bristol Bombay, seen in its production form. The Bombay is fitted with two Bristol Pegasus engines giving over 1,000 h.p. each for take-off and makes use of Rotol constant-speed airscrews.
REFUELLING TESTS: An Armstrong Whitworth A.W.23, acting as the “receiver,” taking on fuel from a Handley Page Harrow, used as the “tanker.” The hose pipe passes from the forward part of the tanker to the stern of the aircraft to be fuelled. Our photograph was taken from the latter machine.
Handley Page Harrows, of the type shown in formation in the Flight photograph, were the first large monoplane bombers to go into service with the R.A.F.
Sir Alan Cobham, managing director of Flight Refuelling, Ltd., in the pilot’s cockpit of the Harrow which is used as a tanker.
From Harrow A.W. XXIII: combination of views gives a good idea of fuelling in the air. The nozzle of the hose pipe is nearing the cone in the tail of the A.W., drawn by the cable, which is shown slightly thickened to make it discernible. By no means the whole length of hose had been reeled off when the picture was taken.
Sequence of making contact: In the upper picture the tanker’s grapnel has caught the hauling line of the receiving aircraft. In the middle photograph the weighted grapnel on the end of the hauling line has nearly reached the winch in the tanker. In the lower picture the end of the hauling line has been attached to the nozzle of the hose, which is, beginning to emerge from the reel on the tanker. The cable is shown slightly thicker to make it discernible.
The hand-operated winch used for bringing the hauling cable on board the tanker.
The nozzle of the hose pipe is shaped to fit the cone in the receiving aircraft, where it is held fast by hydraulically-operated toggles.
FRENCH NIGHT MAIL: The first of the Air Bleu night mail services was run on May 10, when a Caudron Goeland left Paris for Bordeaux and Pau. The machine is seen here on the tarmac at Le Bourget.
Avro Tutors (still extremely popular, though some years old) rehearsing for an Empire Air Day “crazy flying” event at Northolt.
NEW ZEALAND SCENE: One of Union Airways’ D.H.86s over Marlborough Sounds, with the entrance to Tory Channel, Cook Strait, and the North Island in the background. At the moment Union Airways fly 86s from Auckland to Gisborne, Napier, Palmerston North, Blenheim and Christchurch. The company’s Lockheed Electras are used for the through services, and, with the 86s, for the long-distance service between Auckland and Dunedin. This machine is flying on the Dunedin service.
THE AIR MINISTER LOOKS IN: Sir Kingsley Wood interested in the “tricycle” Cygnet during his visit last week to the Hanworth works of General Aircraft, Ltd.; Mr. E. C. Gordon England is showing him its features. “If I had to describe this Company, I should say that it was an enterprising Company,” said Sir Kingsley. Remembering the Cygnet, the pressure-cabin experiments and the firm's extensive rearmament work, the Air Minister’s compliment is deserved.
Mr. Hollis Williams' exposition of the tricycle Cygnet’s possibilities was one of the high spots of the afternoon.
The flying scale model - Heston Phoenix.
THE NEW MASTER: In its production form, the Miles Master two-seater advanced trainer (Rolls-Royce Kestrel XXX) has a re-arranged radiator and certain other minor improvements.
The flying scale model - Miles Master
Capt. Bennett brings the Imperial Airways’ Short boat Australia past the enclosures. On later runs the machine was unphotograpically low.
PHANTASMAGORIA: A Mid-Continent Airlines Lockheed Electra is run up preparatory to a night flight from the Company's base at Kansas City.
WHEN Col. Smallwood (seen here) went to Poland to lecture to Anglo-Polish societies, he travelled by the inaugural British Airways service from London to Warsaw.
The Lockheed Fourteen at Heston on April 17. The Fowler flaps are in the half-way position, while the "letter-box" slots may just be seen near the wins tip.
Hawker Ospreys operating from H.M.S. Glorious beneath a Mediterranean sky that has temporarily veiled its proverbial cloudlessness.
Judging from the photograph the machine - which apparently beats the Heinkel’s three-week’s-old record - has clipped wings, a hidden radiator, a revised cockpit enclosure and additional fin area below the fuselage.
RECORD PROMOTION: Herr Fritz Wendel, who has been promoted by Field Marshal Goering to the rank of Flight Captain following his attainment of about 470 m.p.h. in a Messerschmitt Me.109 R monoplane fitted with a Mercedes-Benz engine.
The flying scale model - Airspeed Envoy
The Fly-past: The Secretary of State for Air, Sir Samuel Hoare, Bart., with whom is Lady Maud Hoare and their son, watching the Blackburn "Iris" flying off Cromer last week.
The original wooden-hulled Iris I (R.-R. Condors)
The Mk. IV Iris with Siddeley Leopards (the centre one drives a pusher propeller)
The picture shows the first Blackburn all-metal machine (1912);
B. C. Hucks flying machine No. 2 over the sands at Filey. The hangar was on top of the cliff, and a concrete slipway led down to the beach.
Robert never minded lending a hand. Here he is installing his first 50 h.p. Gnome engine.
A special fast 80 h.p. monoplane belonging to Dr. Christie (circa 1913).
The little mono-seaplane was used at the flying school on Lake Windermere from 1915 onwards.
Fitted experimentally with a Duncanson tubular-spar wing, the Blackburn Segrave was of advanced conception.
Baffin torpedo bombers are seen in service with the R.A.F.
The Blackburn Blackburd was the first machine to be specifically designed for carrying a torpedo.
Powered with a geared Jupiter, the Beagle torpedo bomber embodied many typical Blackburn features.
Produced for a two-seater fleet fighter competition the Nautilus also had a Kestrel.
The intriguing little Lincock light fighter had a very creditable performance considering its low power.
"Helmets" gave a good aerodynamic improvement, but bad cooling. The Lynx-engined Blackburn Lincock was one type equipped experimentally.
The Blackburn ”G.P.” type, with two 225 h.p. Sunbeam engines, was produced in 1916 and became the forerunner of the later-famous Kangaroo. It is interesting to note that wing-folding was used thus early.
The Pellet flying boat was a racing machine built for the Schneider contest. This aircraft met with an accident just after the photograph was taken and did not participate in the race.
The Airedale monoplane spotter.
READY FOR LAUNCHING: The Blackburn "Sydney" on the slipway at Brough. Fitted with three Rolls-Royce "F" type engines, this machine is an Open Sea Reconnaissance flying boat and the first monoplane of this type to be produced in England. Engineers can get to the engines from the hull through the streamline structure which contains the petrol tanks. A description of this machine was published in our issue of September 5, 1930.
The Dart torpedo carrier was adapted as a seaplane trainer for Reserve use.
The Dart was used in the Fleet Air Arm for many years as a single-seater torpedo carrier. Training versions were two-seaters.
The Velos two-seater.
Fitted with a 1,000 h.p. Napier Cub, the Cubaroo was one ot largest single-engined machines ever built.
The most remarkable Blackburn aeroplane ever produced, the little triplane single-seater fighter pusher.
WINTER OPERATIONS: An early morning scene at the Dominion Skyways’ Semmeterre base in Canada. Bellanca is being refuelled in the foreground while a Fairchild is still resting in its nose-hangar.
An unusual view of the latest Belgian Tipsy, showing the transparent cockpit cover and the general layout. It is familiarly "Tipsy" in appearance
REFUELLING TESTS: An Armstrong Whitworth A.W.23, acting as the “receiver,” taking on fuel from a Handley Page Harrow, used as the “tanker.” The hose pipe passes from the forward part of the tanker to the stern of the aircraft to be fuelled. Our photograph was taken from the latter machine.
From Harrow A.W. XXIII: combination of views gives a good idea of fuelling in the air. The nozzle of the hose pipe is nearing the cone in the tail of the A.W., drawn by the cable, which is shown slightly thickened to make it discernible. By no means the whole length of hose had been reeled off when the picture was taken.
Inside the receiving aircraft: On the back of the cone are the toggles and their piping. The hauling line passes through the central tube to the winch. The petrol pipes run from the two flanges to the tanks, but were not in place when this picture was taken.
The cone in the stern of the receiving aircraft: The ends of the toggles can just be seen projecting through their slits. The weighted grapnel on the end of the hauling line is seen on top of the cockpit coaming. Note that the cable passes through the centre of the cone, into the pipe shown in the internal view on the left.
A Handley Page Hereford (Napier Dagger engines).
The 3-M.R-4, built for Japan. It had a Hispano-Suiza engine.
The first Blackburn biplane was built for the “Circuit-of-Britain” in 1914. It had a 130 h.p. Salmson radial water-cooled engine.
Robert Blackburn’s first monoplane, built during 1908-09. A 35 h.p. Green engine drove the 8ft 6in propeller through a reduction gear.
The first attempt had an underslung chassis and chain drive from the 35 h.p. Green engine to the airscrew.
Another exhibit which aroused interest was the thoroughly unconventional Willoughby Delta (right).
The Blackburn Sidecar produced in 1920 was a side-by-side two-seater. It had a 40 h.p. A.B.C. Gnat engine.
Similar in that both were built with a watertight monocoque fuselage, the Shark and the M.1/30A shown, employed, respectively, the Siddeley Tiger and the Rolls-Royce Buzzard.
The Goshawk-engined F.7/30 fighter which embodied many notable features and carried four guns.
There is something very businesslike about the Reid and Sigrist Trainer, as these three views indicate.
A tail parachute - with a 700-lb. pull - was fitted for the early spinning trials. It was neatly stowed, with one release for the canopy and another to cast it free.
Pilot, observer and rear gunner are placed close together under the transparent roof. The cover over the pilot’s cockpit slides back, and the rear gunner’s tilts up to form a windscreen when he is using the gun.
The picture should be studied for points in the design such as the slotted flaps and ailerons and the very clean underside.
In the somewhat cinematic portrait Mr. George Lowdell doubles for Mr. George Lowdell.
This skeletonised view of the R. and S. Trainer gives a good idea of the structural features of the design. Note particularly how the rear spar is curved inside the fuselage to enable the rear gunner to get to the prone bombing position.
REID and SIGRIST TRAINER (Two 205 h.p. Gipsy Six Series II.)